How To Calculate The ROI Of Your Rental Property (3 Steps)

How to Calculate the ROI of Your Rental Property (3 Steps)

Are you considering investing in a rental property but need to know whether it is a wise financial decision? Determining the potential return on investment (ROI) is one of the most critical steps when evaluating a potential property purchase. Unfortunately, calculating ROI can be complicated and intimidating for novice real estate investors.

Do you want to ensure you get the most out of your rental property investment? Do you need help figuring out how to calculate its ROI? You may feel overwhelmed with all the data and calculations involved in determining whether or not an investment is worth making.

Fortunately, straightforward strategies enable even first-time investors to assess their rental properties’ profitability accurately. In this blog post, we will discuss three easy steps for calculating your rental property’s ROI so that you can confidently invest in real estate!

Definition Of ROI

ROI, or return on investment, is one of the essential metrics for real estate investors to consider when evaluating a potential property purchase. It measures how much money an investor can expect to make from their investment, compared to how much they have invested in it.

To calculate ROI for a rental property, you must first determine what your initial investment is. Your initial investment includes the amount of money put down at purchase and any additional costs associated with closing and preparing the property for tenants. Additionally, investors should factor in any renovation costs, including materials and labor, to arrive at an accurate number.

Importance Of Calculating ROI

Woman looking at graphs.

ROI, or return on investment, is one of the essential metrics for real estate investors to consider when evaluating a potential property purchase. It measures how much money an investor can expect to make from their investment, compared to how much they have invested in it.

To calculate ROI for a rental property, you must first determine what your initial investment is. Your initial investment includes the amount of money put down at purchase and any additional costs associated with closing and preparing the property for tenants. Additionally, investors should factor in any renovation costs, including materials and labor, to arrive at an accurate number.

Step 1: Determine the Initial Investment

Determining the initial investment is the first step to calculating your rental property’s ROI. Your initial investment includes not just the amount of money put down at the time of purchase but all additional costs associated with closing and preparing the property for tenants.

Purchase price of the property

The property’s purchase price is one of the most important factors to consider when calculating ROI. It is the initial investment put into the property and gives investors an idea of how much money they have to work with to make a profit. It’s important to remember that this includes any closing costs or other fees.

Closing costs

Closing costs are any additional fees associated with the purchase of a property. These can include inspection fees, title insurance, registration fees, and legal and escrow services. Closing costs typically amount to about 2-5% of the total purchase price and are due at closing time.

Rehabilitation/renovation costs

Rehabilitation or renovation costs are an essential factor to consider when calculating ROI for a rental property. Repairs and renovations are necessary to ensure that the home is suitable for tenants and can bring in rental income. These costs can include things like painting, replacing flooring, fixing plumbing or wiring issues as well as updating appliances.

Risk and reward ratio.

Step 2: Determine the Annual Income

The next step in calculating your rental property’s return on investment is determining the annual income generated from the investment. Calculate yearly income by adding up all the rental income received from tenants over 12 months and subtracting any ongoing expenses associated with operating and managing the property.

Monthly Rental Income

Typically, the most significant portion of a rental property’s annual income will come from the monthly rent collected from tenants. Rental income should include all additional fees received with renting the property, such as late fees and pet fees but not refundable deposits.

Other income (such as parking or storage rental)

It’s also essential to consider any additional income sources that you generate. Vending machines, laundry, and parking are all ways that properties can earn extra income.

Ongoing Expenses

Once you’ve calculated your annual income, you’ll need to add up your yearly expenses. These include marketing costs, property management fees, property taxes, and maintenance.

  • Marketing: The cost of marketing a rental property, such as advertising and tenant screening fees.
  • Property Management: The cost for a property manager to oversee the daily operations of the rental property.
  • Property Taxes: The annual taxes that are due on rental properties to maintain ownership.
  • Landlord Insurance: Even if you aren’t living at the property, you still need to carry insurance (especially if you have a lien). Landlord insurance covers any liability and repairs on the property due to fire, lightning, wind, hail, or other covered losses.
  • Maintenance: Any repairs or maintenance costs incurred during the year.
Calculator and financial data.

Annual income calculation

To calculate your annual net income subtract your total expenses from your total income. This calculation will give you the yearly profit made by the property. We’ll use this figure in the final step to determine the actual return on investment of the property.

It is important to remember that this figure does not include potential capital gains that may be realized when the property is sold at a later date.

Step 3: Calculate the ROI

Now that you have your annual net income and how much money you put into purchasing the property, you can do the final calculation to determine the actual return on investment. The formula for this is (annual net income/total investment)*100 = ROI.

Calculation of ROI With An All Cash Purchase

Let’s use an example to show exactly how this formula works.

Let’s say you purchased a rental property for $200,000 cash, and the total cost of closing and rehab was $15,000. Your out-of-pocket investment is $215,000

Between basic rehab and finding a tenant, you rent the home for 11 months out of the year for $1,800 per month. This monthly rent equates to a total annual income of $19,800.

Next, you had $5,500 in annual expenses between taxes, maintenance, insurance, and property management.

Your annual net income from this property is $14,300.

To calculate your ROI, we would use the formula: ($14,300/($200,000 + $15,000)) X 100 = 6.65%.

Man on calculator and computer.

Calculation of ROI With A Financed Purchase

Let’s do another example but instead of using cash for the entire purchase, let’s see how financing affects the ROI.

Let’s say you purchased a rental property for $200,000 and the total cost of closing and rehab was $15,000. You took a 30-year loan out for $160,000, so your out-of-pocket investment is $55,000. ($200,000 + $15,000 – $160,000)

Between basic rehab and finding a tenant, you rent the home for 11 months out of the year for $1,800 per month. This monthly payment equates to a total annual income of $19,800.

Next, you had $16,300 in annual expenses between your mortgage payment, taxes, maintenance, insurance, and property management.

Your annual net income from this property is $3,500.

To calculate your ROI, we would use the following formula: ($3,500/($55,000)) X 100 = 6.3%.

Factors that can impact ROI

Some additional factors that can impact your rental property’s ROI include:

  • Financing Terms: Different financing terms, such as shorter loan periods or lower interest rates, can increase your ROI.
  • Vacancy rate: The more frequently the unit is occupied, the higher your ROI will be.
  • Major repairs (sometimes called Capital Expenditures): If a major repair or renovation must be done to the property, it can lower your ROI.
  • Length of time held: Over time, your ROI can decrease as you accumulate equity in the property. After a couple of years, I like to recalculate my ROI based on the total equity I have in the property because this is a more accurate representation of the money I have “invested” in the property at that time.
Calculator and graph.

How to interpret the ROI

An ROI of 8% -12 % is considered a good return on investment. You should reconsider your investment options if your numbers fall below 8%. Historically, a simple investment in the S&P 500 has provided average returns of 10%. If your ROI is lower than that, it may not be worth the extra effort, risk, and responsibility.

Conclusion

In conclusion, calculating the Return on Investment of rental property requires three steps:

  • Obtaining all relevant financial information for the purchase and rehab costs.
  • Determining how much income you’ve generated from renting out the property.
  • Using this figure in the final step to determine the actual return on investment.

It’s important to note that this doesn’t include potential capital gains when sold later, but it can still give you an idea of how well your real estate investments are doing.

With these calculations under your belt, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions about which properties will yield higher returns and provide better long-term value for your portfolio.

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Calculator and papers.

FAQs

What is the 2% rule in real estate?

The 2% rule is a guideline for how much you should charge in rent. Generally, that is $2,000 for every $100,000 your home is worth. But not every housing market follows or can support this rule; you also need to look at market rent. 0.8% to 1.3% is more likely.

What is a good ROI on rentals?

Most property management companies will attempt to get an ROI of above 10%, but anywhere from 5% to 10% is also valid. It depends on your rental market.

Is equity part of ROI in real estate rentals?

It depends. You can certainly include equity in your investment property ROI calculations, but you can also leave it out. Just make sure that you’re consistent when comparing a real estate investment with another investment.

Kyle Handy

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